Give your heart and it will return fractured,
mangled, twisted, crumpled, crushed.
Play a chivalrous chord, extend some aid
and the door will be slammed on that hand.
Go out on a limb and it will be trimmed
leaving your bones at the base.

There’s a danger in loving too much.

Give a leg up and you will be stepped on.
Save some bacon and none will be shared.
Pay the bail, loan a buck, and they’ll skip town.
Write a love song, they’ll laugh; you’re a clown.
Play all of your cards, trusting the truth,
And a poker face gathers your coins.
Give your heart and it will return in pieces,
shattered, splintered and split.

There’s a danger in loving too much.

For this is a haywire world of destruction
and the tyranny of entropy breaks us all.
Crippled I will arrive on the other side,
completely spent, a heart in tatters.
But here is a mystery: In death we are remade.
And cracks are where the light shines through.

There’s a danger in loving too much.

 

 

 

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Day Eleven:  Write a Bop poem.  The invention of poet Afaa Michael Weaver, the Bop is a kind of combination sonnet + song. Like a Shakespearan sonnet, it introduces, discusses, and then solves (or fails to solve) a problem. Like a song, it relies on refrains and repetition. In the basic Bop poem, a six-line stanza introduces the problem, and is followed by a one-line refrain. The next, eight-line stanza discusses and develops the problem, and is again followed by the one-line refrain. Then, another six-line stanza resolves or concludes the problem, and is again followed by the refrain.

 

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